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Workshop Description

This workshop was a collaborative effort between Virginia Tech - Advanced Research Institute, USA and Southeast University, China. It brought together approximately 30 experts from both United States and China who could help identify challenges and opportunities for large-scale development of the smart grid.

Specific objectives for the workshop were:

  • To identify challenges of smart grid development in the United States and China;
  • To identify technologies — electric power, sensing, computing and communication infrastructures necessary to support smart grid development and high penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources;
  • To identify best practices and lessons learned based on deployment experience in smart grid projects implemented in the United States and China;
  • To identify challenges and research topics that the participants can use as a context to propose new research in this field; and
  • To provide international networking opportunities and potential for future research collaboration.

This workshop aimed at creating a synergy among smart grid experts from the United States and China. and expose U.S. participants to challenges, lessons learned and best practices of smart grid development and implementation from the Chinese experience and their plans to address this issue. The U.S. participants from academia — including students, early career researchers and senior faculty members — had the opportunity to learn industry best practices, and to share their R&D knowledge. This activity has served as a basis for future academia-industry collaboration and for conducting joint research and/or setting up joint programs on smart grid among several U.S. and the Chinese institutions. Participants from China also had the opportunity to learn from the U.S. experience in smart grid implementation, including integration of intermittent sources, microgrid operation, smart homes, advanced metering infrastructure and demand response. They also had access to lessons learned, best practices and findings from several smart grid projects in the United States.

The financial and material support provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation were invaluable in making this workshop possible.

© 2013 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University